Providing students with access to high-quality, affordable summer-learning programs supports healthy development and skill retention.

The school year is coming to an end, and students are brimming with excitement for days filled with friends, outdoor fun and cool treats. However, most students who do not engage in learning during the summer months will lose critical math and reading skills. Providing students with access to high-quality, affordable summer-learning programs supports healthy development and skill retention. The report “Getting to Work on Summer Learning” by Catherine Augustine et al. offers the following tips for launching or improving your summer-learning program:

  • Plan early. Start planning for your summer program in January. Begin hiring staff, selecting the curriculum, recruiting students, and so on. Proper planning results in fewer problems and more instructional time for students.
  • Provide fun, engaging enrichment activities. Offer activities such as the arts, sports and science exploration to boost attendance and differentiate your summer program from a traditional “summer school.”
  • Seek funding. Find ways to support the costs of offering summer programming. Get ideas on finding funding in this free download by the National Summer Learning Association: A Strategic Roadmap for Funding in Tough Times.
  • Provide staff training and support. Hire highly motivated and effective teachers, and provide sufficient training and ongoing support to achieve teacher quality.

To learn more, read the full report “Getting to Work on Summer Learning.”